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Common Missteps Industrial Metal-Cutting Companies Should Avoid in Lean Manufacturing

October 15, 2015 / , , , , , , , , , ,


If there is one “go-to” answer for solving a company’s productivity issues, most experts point to lean manufacturing. The lean movement is, as one author put it here, “our current silver bullet.”

At this point, most manufacturers have jumped on the bandwagon and have incorporated at least some lean principles into their operation. Some companies like A.M. Castle, a metal service center featured in a recent case study, have undergone complete lean transformations, while others have adopted basic lean tools like 5S.

However, even with the growing popularity of lean manufacturing and its countless success stories, the reality is that not every lean journey is smooth. In fact, according to research from management consulting firm Quality for Business Success, Inc. (QBS), many are actually quite bumpy. After conducting 200 interviews with managers and lean champions from 71 different companies engaged in lean implementations, QBS found that many managers experienced “false starts” and felt overwhelmed by the learning curve. “Many managers we spoke with find themselves ‘drowning in a sea of half-understood tools and techniques,’” the firm states in a white paper. “Others, unaware of their narrow interpretation of lean, boast successful implementations when they’ve actually barely scratched the surface.”

To help companies achieve successful lean implementations, QBS outlined the most common missteps companies make in the process in a white paper. Below are the top 15 pitfalls managers should avoid:

  1. Thinking of 5S as something you do to an area
  2. Imposing 5S top-down, with limited involvement bottom-up
  3. Equating waste reduction with cost cutting
  4. Remaining aloof to the larger global end-to-end value stream
  5. Assuming your Future State Value Stream Mapping (VSM) is nothing more than your Current State VSM with the identified improvement opportunities corrected or addressed.
  6. Equating visual workplace with top-down visual communication
  7. Viewing Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) as an improvement initiative that exclusively relates to engineering and maintenance personnel
  8. Using overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) to evaluate operations rather than as an improvement gauge
  9. Equating Standard Work with procedures
  10. Engaging in “industrial tourism” and thinking you are benchmarking
  11. Pursuing a one-size-fits-all solution to production planning and control
  12. Forgetting to reduce supermarket inventories once established
  13. Preconditioning continuous flow to waste elimination
  14. Believing you will achieve a lean transformation applying lean tools
  15. Betting your strategy on lean

To read more about these common missteps, you can download the full QBS white paper, The 15 Most Common Mistakes in Lean Implementations, here.

What has been your experience with lean manufacturing? Have you made one or more of these missteps?