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Determining which KPIs to Measure in Your Ball and Roller Bearing Operation

September 30, 2016 / , , , , , , ,


Most companies that have adopted lean manufacturing strategies know the importance of measurement. When a manufacturing operation can quantitatively assess their performance, it can start to make significant improvements and set realistic goals to stay competitive. In fact, according to a series of case studies on high production metal-cutting companies, measurement was noted as a key best practice.

However, metrics are only meaningful if they are tied to strategy. That’s where key performance indicators (KPIs) come into play. Unfortunately, some companies fail to understand the purpose of KPIs and, therefore, are unable to take full advantage of the benefits they can provide. All KPIs are metrics, but not all metrics are KPIs. Understanding the difference is critical.

What are KPIs?
KPIs are the measurements selected by a company to give an overall indication of the health of the business. KPIs are typically dominated by historical, financial measurements, but most experts agree that they are more valuable if they also include operational measurements. Unfortunately, choosing the right KPIs to track isn’t as easy as it sounds and takes careful consideration.

There are hundreds of KPIs that can be measured, but experts suggest that companies focus on a select few. According to the University of Tennessee’s Reliability and Maintainability Center (RMC), manufacturers need to make sure all KPIs are aligned with the company’s business goals and strategy. Tasks should be explicit and all actions should support a larger goal. When it comes to KPIs, it is quality—not quantity—that matters.

Choosing the Right KPI
Because they are tied to strategy, KPIs will vary by organization. However, an article from Red Lion outlines seven of the common production KPIs used on automated plant floors:

  1. Count (Good or Bad). An essential factory floor metric relates to the amount of product produced. The count (good or bad) typically refers to either the amount of product produced since the last machine changeover or the production sum for the entire shift or week.
  2. Reject Ratio. Production processes occasionally produce scrap, which is measured in terms of reject ratio. Minimizing scrap helps organizations meet profitability goals so it is important to track whether or not the amount being produced is within tolerable limits.
  3. Rate. Machines and processes produce goods at variable rates. When speeds differ, slow rates typically result in dropped profits while faster speeds affect quality control. This is why it is important for operating speeds to remain consistent.
  4. Target. Many organizations display target values for output, rate and quality. This KPI helps motivate employees to meet specific performance targets.
  5. Takt Time. Takt time is the amount of time, or cycle time, for the completion of a task. This could be the time it takes to produce a product, but it more likely relates to the cycle time of specific operations. This KPI helps manufacturers quickly determine where the constraints or bottlenecks are within a process.
  6. Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE). OEE is a metric that multiplies availability by performance and quality to determine resource utilization. Production managers want OEE values to increase because this indicates more efficient utilization of available personnel and machinery.
  7. Downtime. Whether the result of a breakdown or simply a machine changeover, downtime is considered one of the most important KPI metrics to track. When machines are not operating, money isn’t being made so reducing downtime is an easy way to increase profitability.

Making it Count
For many managers, the above list and the resulting data may feel overwhelming. Others may be so afraid of missing something that they end up measuring more information than necessary. For example, research from the Advanced Performance Institute finds that less than 10% of all the metrics that are collected, analyzed and reported in businesses are ever used to inform decision-making.  That means 90% of the metrics are wasted, or worse, used to drown people in data while they are thirsting for insights.

The question then becomes: How many KPIs are enough? Or, even more so, how much data is too much?

An article from IndustryWeek suggests that companies follow the “Rule of Three,” which involves dividing all KPIs into organizational categories and then focusing on the top three metrics within that category. This is a good way to keep managers focused on improvement without data overload.

If you are still unsure where to place your focus, the University of Wisconsin-Madison recommends that manufacturers in 2016 zero in on KPIs that fall under the following four themes:

As a high production manufacturer, odds are that your ball and roller bearing operation is already tracking some of the above KPIs. However, if that is not the case, now is the time to start identifying a few to measure. If the process feels overwhelming, do some research, ask your supply chain for help, and get started. In the words of quality expert H. James Harrington: “Measurement is the first step that leads to control and, eventually, to improvement.”