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blade life

3 Strategies to Reduce Procurement Costs in Small and Mid-Sized Forges

July 25, 2016 / , , , , , , , , ,


Cost reduction will always be a top priority for manufacturers. However, in today’s ultra-competitive and uncertain market, manufacturing executives need to be both creative and strategic as they look for new ways to reduce costs.

As stated in the white paper, Top Five Operating Challenges for Forges that Cut and Process Metal, there are several ways forges are reducing operational costs. Measuring total cost, monitoring blade life, and instituting ongoing preventative maintenance programs are just a few examples. According to the recently revised Forging Industry Technology Roadmap, the forging industry as a whole is also working toward finding new ways to reduce material and energy usage costs—two of the most significant cost factors in forging.

A recent article published by Thomasnet, however, notes that while the tendency is for small and mid-sized businesses to focus on reducing costs for their overall operations, there is also a huge benefit to reducing costs within specific business functions, most notably procurement.

“Small businesses spend between 45 and 65 percent of sales revenue on procurement of inputs,” the article states. “Therefore, procurement should be considered a viable opportunity to reduce costs and improve efficiency. Even basic changes to the procurement process can cut procurement costs by 5 to15 percent and start a smaller business on the road to strategic sourcing.”

The article goes on to list five strategies small and mid-size operations can use to improve procurement. Read below for a summary of three of the five best practices (You can read the full article here.):

  1. Build and Maintain Strategic Partnerships. Small firms should seek strategic partnerships with key suppliers. Purchasing from fewer suppliers saves time and resources while building trust. A small business owner can talk openly with a strategic partner and ensure the company is not overspending due to unnecessary costs.
  2. Improve Internal Procurement Processes. Procurement efforts should include annual analysis of spend and demand, with supplier pricing reviews occurring semi-annually or even quarterly. Use spend analysis to detail all costs and terms associated with procurement and demand analysis to define essential needs with a focus on improving cost and quantity.
  3. Organize with Others to Increase Buying Power. Partnering with other small businesses can yield volume discounts and achieve savings. Consortiums put the benefits of economies of scale into effect for small businesses that would otherwise be left paying premiums.

Of course, there are no quick fixes when it comes to cost reduction. However, by taking the time to approach cost strategically—and perhaps even one business function at a time—small and mid-sized forges can make improvements that may have a long-term and sustainable impact on the bottom line.

What strategies has your forge adopted to reduce costs?

blade life

Choosing the Right Band Saw Blade for Your Forge

June 25, 2016 / , , , , , ,


In band sawing, forges and other industrial metal-cutting companies typically rely on two types of blades—bi-metal and carbide-tipped blades. Both blade technologies offer more performance and life expectancy than carbon steel blades, and choosing between the two types used to be fairly straightforward. However, advancements in both technologies have made it a little more difficult for companies to make the best blade choice for their operations.

While sawing is just a small part of the forging process, achieving operational excellence requires managers to optimize all aspects of the forging operation. To help forges make the best decision about the “right” blade type for their band-sawing operations, below is a brief overview on both blade types from the white paper, Selecting the Right Cutting Tools for the Job.

Bi-Metal Blades
Bi-metal blades are a common choice for most metal-cutting applications, especially since they are more affordable than carbide-tipped blades. In bi-metal blade construction, high-speed steel edge material is welded to fatigue resistant spring steel backing, providing a good combination of cutting performance and fatigue life.

Generally speaking, bi-metal blades are sub-divided into the following two categories:

  1. General-purpose blades are often used for easier-to-cut metals such as aluminum and non-ferrous metals, carbon steels, structural steels, and some alloy steels. These blades are also good for switching between different metal types and sizes, as well as from solids to structural pieces. However, some industry experts warn to be judicious when switching between different metal types, sizes and shapes, as subjecting blades to different types of cutting can shorten blade life.
  2. Production-sawing blades tend to be more versatile and are able to cut everything from the easiest-to-cut materials to difficult-to-cut nickel-based alloys. These blades are also ideal for cutting structural pieces and bundles, and they typically offer a long blade life and fast, straight cutting.

Carbide-Tipped Blades
Like bi-metal blades, carbide-tipped blades are made of at least two different types of material. In most cases, carbide tips are welded to a high-strength alloy back, providing a longer lasting, smoother cutting blade.

Although carbide-tipped blades are typically more expensive than bi-metal blades, shops may elect to trade up to a carbide-tipped blade for three key reasons:

  1. longer life
  2. faster cutting
  3. better finish

The various choices of carbide-tipped blades will cover the machinability spectrum, but they are most often used for hard-to-cut materials like super alloys. High-performance carbide-tipped blades work especially well with hard tool steel that needs to be cut fast. Some high-performance carbide-tipped blades—especially coated versions—can offer extreme cutting rates, while others can perform exceptionally well when cutting super alloys.

Weighing the Options
As explained in the white paper, Top 5 Operating Challenges for Forges that Cut and Process Metal, having the right blade for the job optimizes cut times, cut quality, and blade life, especially when cutting tougher metals like stainless steel and super alloys. This is particularly important in forged materials, which require aggressive blades with varied tooth geometries that can get underneath any scale buildup.

Of course, there will always be instances when the “right” blade choice won’t be clear cut and will require managers to strategically choose between a “good,” “better” and “best” option. For example, bi-metal band saw blades have been traditionally used for easier-to-cut metals such as aluminum and non-ferrous metals, carbon and structural steels, and some alloy steels. However, as featured here in Modern Metals, LENOX offers a carbide-tipped band saw blade that has been designed specifically to cut aluminum and non-ferrous alloys. The new blade has a range of features that are optimized  for aluminum cutting applications, including a specialized grade of carbide on the tip, a multi-chip tooth pattern, and a high rake angle.

Another example is noted in an article from Canadian Industrial Machinery. According to the article, bi-metal blades can be used to cut super alloys; however, as the article explains, cutting speeds will need to be slower and blades will wear out faster than when using carbide blades. “An experienced operator can adjust parameters to cut the occasional super alloy with a bimetal blade, but carbide is the choice to cost-effectively cut large quantities of hard materials,” the article states. “Blade choice comes down to a cost-per-cut situation and what fits with a shop’s operation.”

Making the Right Choice
Indeed, blade selection needs to take into account the total operational costs of running the blade, including maintenance costs and equipment requirements. Case in point: While carbide-tipped blades are more advanced in the right application, they do not perform well with a lot of vibration. Therefore, they can only be used with certain saws. Metal-cutting operations using carbide-tipped blades need to make sure they are using a saw that can run the blade speeds that are required.

In the end, the “right” blade choice requires forges to weigh the following:

By understanding some of the basic features of each blade type and then strategically assessing operational needs and goals, managers can make informed purchasing decisions that will factor into the bottom line and, ultimately, contribute to the shop’s overall success.

blade life

Tips for Improving Circular Saw Blade Life in Ball and Roller Bearing Production

May 30, 2016 / , , , , , , , , , ,


For any metal-cutting operation, bottlenecks are the enemy. Whether caused by machine error, tooling failure, user error, or some other maintenance issue, the end result is typically the same—increased downtime, rework, and scrap, all of which eat into the bottom line. And for a high-production operation like ball and roller bearing manufacturing, a hiccup in early sawing operations can quickly wreak havoc on the entire production process and schedule.

Although circular sawing may seem like a simple operation, there are number of variables that play a role in achieving consistent, quality cuts while also getting the most out of each saw blade. As an archived article from Fabricating & Metalworking explains, “Saws are very much like the people who use them: they don’t react well to heat, shock, abrasion, stress, and tension.” Far too often, managers and operators ignore these critical factors and, as a result, experience premature blade failure and end up going through far more blades than necessary.

Proper cutting speeds, feed rates, blade tension, and lubrication all tie into blade life—a factor any blade buyer knows is critical when it comes to cost.

“Precision circular saw blades can be upwards of  $200 a piece, so you don’t want to just go through those,” Mike Baron, vice president of Jett Cutting, says in a case study published by the LENOX Institute of Technology (LIT). “If I am getting 100 pieces an hour at this setting, but push it up to get 150, I may be going through twice as many blades. It just isn’t cost effective.”

Glen Sliwa, maintenance manager at metal service center A.M. Castle & Co, also focuses on blade life to better manage costs. In addition to following a strict preventative maintenance program to save on tooling and equipment costs, Sliwa says it is just as critical to ensure operators know how to optimize blade life. This includes training operators to follow manufacturer suggested cutting parameters, as well as closely tracking tolerance requirements so blades can be reused whenever possible.

“We’re looking at how many pieces that we can get off that blade and then stand perpendicular to the part,” Sliwa explains. “If you have to stay within ten-thousandths or five-thousandths on the cut, and that blade is no good, I can take it off that machine and put it on another one and I can cut an eighth of an inch, 125 thousandths. So I’m still getting more blade life out of it, but it’s not interfering with that customer’s specifications.”

To help ball and roller bearing manufacturers extend the life of their circular saw blades, the below chart offers a few troubleshooting tips from LIT’s reference guide, “Tips and Tricks to Optimize Your Precision Circular Sawing Operation.” By understanding some common blade issues and their root causes, operators can reduce premature blade failure and, in turn, improve your  operation’s overall productivity and save on tooling costs.
chart 3

For more downloadable information on optimizing your company’s precision circular sawing operation, you can visit LIT’s resource page here.

blade life

Small Optimization Opportunities for Your Machine Shop

March 20, 2016 / , , , , , , , , ,


Although the metalworking industry was hoping 2016 would be a year of growth, recent reports show continued declines in both new orders and production rates in February. While no one is worried that business is going to completely plummet, the sobering reality is that shops need to continue to focus on cost reduction and optimization to survive in today’s unpredictable and competitive market.

The challenge for many shops is figuring out where to optimize. After a few rough years, many shops have already implemented large-scale improvements to increase efficiency and save costs.  According to the results of Modern Machine Shop’s annual Top Shop Survey, 62 percent of leading machine shops (or “top shops”) have developed a formal continuous improvement program, and most use manufacturing tools like 5S workplace organization, cellular manufacturing, and value stream mapping.

What else, then, can possibly be improved? For some shops, the answer may be to “think small.” Take band sawing as an example. When thinking about optimization, the instinct for most operation managers is to focus on the efficiency of the saw, the workflow process, and maybe even the operator. But what about the tools? Could they be optimized?

If we are talking about band saw blades, the answer is yes. As explained in the LENOX Guide to Band Sawing, completing a proper break-in procedure on a new band saw blade will significantly increase its life (see photo). This not only allows the shop to cut more material, it also reduces unnecessary downtime to replace blades and lowers the cost of replacement blades.

When it comes to consumable tools like blades, many machine shops fail to understand the critical role they can play in the overall success of their sawing equipment and, ultimately, their entire operation.  In fact, according to a benchmark study of machine shops and other industrial metal-cutting companies, less than half (45%) of the organizations surveyed reported they “always” break in blades, 30 percent said they do it “most of the time,” and 15 percent said they do it “occasionally.” This means that the majority of industrial metal-cutting shops are missing out on a simple and effective opportunity for optimization.

This can be true of other “small” aspects of your cutting operations. As covered here in an earlier blog post, running blades at the right speed settings and proper lubrication can also directly affect your shop’s productivity, costs, and quality. Other metalworking operations, such as welding and punching, have similar best practices that offer opportunities for optimization, allowing you to get the most out of your manufacturing tools.

Like any change, optimization starts small. What areas of your shop’s operations are you overlooking?

For more bandsawing tips, including how to properly break-in blades, click here to download LENOX’s Guide to Bandsawing.

blade life

Choosing the Right Blade for Your Fabrication Shop’s Band Saw Operations

March 10, 2016 / , , , , , , ,


In band-sawing, fabricators and other industrial metal-cutting companies typically rely on two types of blades—bi-metal and carbide-tipped blades. Both blade technologies offer more performance and life expectancy than carbon steel blades, and choosing between the two types used to be fairly straightforward. However, advancements in both technologies have made it a little more difficult for companies to make the best blade choice for their operations.

For example, bi-metal band saw blades have been traditionally used for easier-to-cut metals such as aluminum and non-ferrous metals, carbon and structural steels, and some alloy steels. However, as featured here in Modern Metals, a new carbide-tipped band saw blade has been introduced by LENOX that has been designed specifically to cut aluminum and non-ferrous alloys. The new blade has a range of features that optimize it for aluminum cutting applications, including a specialized grade of carbide on the tip, a multi-chip tooth pattern, and a high rake angle.

To help metal fabricators make the best decision about the “right” blade type for their band-sawing operations, below is a brief overview on both blade types from the white paper, Selecting the Right Cutting Tools for the Job.

Bi-Metal Blades
Bi-metal blades are a common choice for most metal-cutting applications, especially since they are more affordable than carbide-tipped blades.

Generally speaking, bi-metal blades are sub-divided as either general-purpose blades or production-sawing blades:

Carbide-Tipped Blades
Although carbide-tipped blades are more expensive, machine shops may elect to trade up to a carbide-tipped blade for three key reasons:

The various choices of carbide-tipped blades will cover the machinability spectrum, but they are most often used for hard-to-cut materials like super alloys. High-performance carbide-tipped blades work especially well with hard tool steel that needs to be cut fast. Some high-performance carbide-tipped blades—especially coated versions—can offer extreme cutting rates, while others can perform exceptionally well when cutting super alloys.

Making the Right Choice
Of course, there are instances when the “right” blade choice won’t be clear cut and will require managers to strategically choose between a “good,” “better” and “best” option. For example, as this article from Canadian Industrial Machinery (CIM) explains, bi-metal blades can be used to cut superalloys. However, cutting speeds will need to be slower and blades will wear out faster than when using carbide blades. “An experienced operator can adjust parameters to cut the occasional superalloy with a bimetal blade, but carbide is the choice to cost-effectively cut large quantities of hard materials,” the article states. “Blade choice comes down to a cost-per-cut situation and what fits with a shop’s operation.”

Blade selection also needs to take into account the total operational costs of running the blade, including maintenance costs and equipment requirements. Case in point: While carbide-tipped blades are more advanced in the right application, they do not perform well with a lot of vibration. Therefore, they can only be used with certain saws. Metal-cutting operations using carbide-tipped blades need to make sure they are using a saw that can run the blade speeds that are required. In other words, the saw must have a motor that can push the blade fast enough and one that has a more rigid construction with better vibration dampening to accommodate these types of blades.

In the end, the “right” blade choice requires fabricators to weigh the following:

By understanding some of the basic features of each blade type and then strategically assessing operational needs and goals, managers can make informed purchasing decisions that will help their metal-cutting operations reach their full potential and, ultimately, achieve market success.

blade life

Optimizing Your Metal Service Center with Cost per Cut Improvements

March 5, 2016 / , , , , , , , , ,


For any manufacturing company, cost reduction has always been—and will likely always be—a top priority. However, like many other business strategies, managers are starting to look at cost management holistically. Instead of simply looking at price tags and cost reduction, today’s managers are looking at long-term return on investment and optimization.

This type of “holistic” approach to cost management is being adopted by several large manufacturers, including food giant General Mills, but it can also be applied on the shop floor of any industrial metal-cutting operation. One specific way metal service centers can apply this concept is by measuring “cost per cut.”

Instead of simply looking at the cost of a blade or even how many cuts a blade performs,  “cost per cut” measures the total cost it takes for a shop to perform a cut, including raw material, blade, machine and operator costs. This metric gives service centers a better indication of overall production profitability.

A good analysis of cost per cut should include the following:

Of course, the question for many companies is not how to measure cost per cut, but rather, how they can reduce their cost per cut. Tools like the spreadsheet calculator, “ROI Analysis of Making Improvements to Cost Per Cut,” can be helpful in making that determination. The tool takes into consideration all equipment and factors beyond mechanics that can improve cost per cut rates and a shop’s bottom line.

Another optimization tool, SAWCALC, may also be helpful. The free, web-based software program recommends the correct band saw blade and sawing parameters based on material composition, size, shape and machine model, feed speed, as well as blade and tooth specifications that can streamline sawing processes and extend blade life.

One practical way service centers can reduce cost per cut is to consider investing in a coated saw blade. According to an article from Canadian Industrial Machinery, coating can extend blade life by 100 percent or more and slice cutting time in half, depending on the blade material, coating, and the material being cut.

Although coatings can add a premium of 30 to 50 percent to the cost of a blade, there are instances when the upfront cost can pay off. “You need a reason like a challenging material, a need for extra performance, or a machine that is creating a bottleneck and needs to produce more parts,” Daniel Fernandes, brand manager for band saw blades at LENOX, explains in the CIM article. “Upgrade to a coated blade and you can pump more jobs through the same equipment. You’ll get more out of your overhead costs and your labor.”

Another service center, featured here in a case study, was able to improve its cost per cut by re-adjusting its sawing parameters, increasing its operator training, and upgrading some of its blades. In one instance, the service center was able to reduce cut time by 40 percent.

Is a new, upgraded blade always the answer? Of course not, but optimization should always be the goal. This is why metrics like cost per cut are so important. By focusing more on reducing the true cost of each cut—and not just the price tag of a blade—managers can optimize their metal-cutting operations and, hopefully, see the results in the bottom line.

How has your service center improved cost per cut? What tools have helped you optimize your operations?

blade life

Tips for Preventing Premature Band Saw Blade Failure in Your Forging Operation

January 25, 2016 / , , , , , , , , , , ,


For any metal-cutting operation, blade life is critical. Premature blade failure not only results in increased tooling costs, it can also increase downtime, rework, and scrap—all of which eat into the bottom line.

For forges that cut and process metal, however, blade life is even more crucial. The scale that forms on forged metal pieces can quickly deteriorate blade life, which makes blade selection extremely important. In most cases, forges require aggressive bandsaw blades with varied tooth geometries that can get underneath any scale buildup (i.e., carbide-tipped blades).

While choosing the right blade is a good start, blade life also relies on a variety of other variables, including proper cutting speeds, feed rates, blade tension, lubrication, and break-in procedures. As an article form Fabricating & Metalworking explains, “Saws are very much like the people who use them: they don’t react well to heat, shock, abrasion, stress, and tension.” Far too often, managers and operators ignore these critical factors and, as a result, experience premature blade failure and end up going through far more blades than necessary.

To help forges extend the life of their band saw blades, below are a few troubleshooting tips from the reference guide, “User Error or Machine Error?”, from the LENOX Institute of Technology. By understanding some common blade issues and their root causes, operators can reduce and, hopefully, eliminate premature blade failure.

Issue #1: Heavy Even Wear On Tips and Corners Of Teeth
The wear on teeth is smooth across the tips and the corners of set teeth have become rounded.

Probable Cause:

Issue #2: Wear On Both Sides Of Teeth
The side of teeth on both sides of band have heavy wear markings.

Probable Cause:

Issue #3: Wear On One Side Of Teeth
Only one side of teeth has heavy wear markings.

Probable Cause:

Issue #4: Chipped Or Broken Teeth
A scattered type of tooth breakage on tips and corners of the teeth.

Probable Cause:

Issue #5: Body Breakage Or Cracks From Back Edge
The fracture originates from the back edge of band. The origin of the fracture is indicated by a flat area on the fracture surface.

Probable Cause:

For more information on extending blade life, download the full reference guide, “User Error or Machine Error?” here, or check out The LENOX Guide to Band Sawing.

blade life

Fabricators Stay Competitive By Proactively Addressing Downtime

January 10, 2016 / , , , , , , , , , , , ,


It’s no secret that downtime is the enemy of any fabrication shop and, really, any manufacturer. Huge volumes, continuous sawing, and extremely tight tolerances are characteristic of many fabrication environments, so any process or workflow bottlenecks that slow production can cause quality issues, slow delivery schedules, increased maintenance costs, and hurt overall business performance.

In the white paper, The Top 5 Operating Challenges Facing Fabricators’ Metal-Cutting Operations, Jim Davis, corporate operations services manager at O’Neal Steel, explains why today’s shops can’t afford any unplanned downtime. “Downtime affects us heavily,” Davis states. “When you’re cutting five- to six-thousand pieces for a customer or you’re doing ‘just-in-time’ production where you’re taking orders on the previous day and guaranteeing delivery the next day, downtime will affect us heavily.”

However, instead of finding new ways to react to unplanned downtime events, several leading manufacturers are attacking the issue head on by using proactive strategies. In fact, according to a recent blog published by ARC Advisory Group, Inc., four industrial manufacturing leaders are aiming for “zero downtime”—a goal that may seem a bit lofty and unrealistic. However, with the help of technology, these big name companies seem to believe it is within reach.

For example, late last year, Cisco and Fanuc America announced a 12-month Zero Downtime (ZDT) pilot project with a major automotive manufacturer. The goal was to achieve zero downtime by proactively detecting equipment issues that could cause downtime.

According to a press release, the pilot was a success. Using cloud-based technology, Fanuc and Cisco’s solution detected and informed the automotive manufacturer of potential equipment or process problems before unexpected downtime occurred, allowing the maintenance issue to be addressed in a planned outage window. The end result was a significant decrease in related production downtime and increased overall equipment effectiveness. (To learn more about Fanuc’s technology solution, check out this video).

There are other types of proactive strategies metal-cutting leaders are using to turn “interruptive downtime,” which can hurt performance and impact on-time customer delivery, into “predictive downtime,” which can actually improve cutting performance and extend equipment life. Research shows that simple strategies such as breaking in band saw blades and other preventative maintenance are helping fabricators and other metal-cutting companies predict blade failure and, as a result, better plan for downtime.

In a benchmark survey of industrial metal-cutting organizations, 67 percent of operations that claimed to follow all scheduled and planned maintenance on their machines also reported that their job completion rate is trending upward year over year – a meaningful correlation. “The implication is that less disruptive, unplanned downtime and more anticipated, planned downtime translates into more jobs being completed on time,” the study states. “Slightly more than half (51 percent) of organizations that ‘always’ follow scheduled and preventative maintenance plans say that blade failure is predicted ‘always’ or ‘mostly.’”

What could be the business impact of near-zero unplanned downtime? According to the ARC blog, there are at least four key benefits, including:

Even if the concept of zero downtime still seems impossible, the above examples show that proactive—not reactive—strategies can help eliminate unplanned downtime. Whether using high-tech solutions like Cisco and Fanuc’s cloud-based application or simple preventative strategies like breaking in blades, today’s fabrication shops have the opportunity to reduce unplanned downtime and achieve real, bottom-line benefits.

What strategies does your fabrication shop use to reduce or predict downtime?

blade life

Making the Right Band Saw Blade Choice in Your Machine Shop

December 20, 2015 / , , , , , , , , ,


For decades, machine shops and other industrial metal-cutting companies have mostly relied on two types of band saw blades—bi-metal and carbide-tipped blades. Both blade technologies offer more performance and life expectancy than carbon steel blades, and choosing between the two types used to be fairly straightforward. However, advancements in both technologies have made it a little more difficult for companies to make the “right” blade choice.

For example, bi-metal band saw blades have been traditionally used for easier-to-cut metals such as aluminum and non-ferrous metals, carbon and structural steels, and some alloy steels. However, as featured here in Modern Metals, a new carbide-tipped band saw blade has been introduced by LENOX that has been designed specifically to cut aluminum and nonferrous alloys. The new blade has a range of features that optimize it for aluminum cutting applications, including a specialized grade of carbide on the tip, a multi-chip tooth pattern, and a high rake angle.

As this archived article from Production Machining notes, next-generation coatings and more complex tooth designs in both bi-metal and carbide blades have given metal-cutting companies more high-performance cutting options. Although this is certainly a good thing for end users, it can also make it more difficult for managers trying to decide between a “good” and “best” blade choice.

To help machines shops make the best decision about the “right” blade type for their band-sawing operations, below is a brief overview on both blade types from the white paper, Selecting the Right Cutting Tools for the Job.

Bi-Metal Blades
Bi-metal blades are a common choice for most metal-cutting applications, especially since they are more affordable than carbide-tipped blades.

Generally speaking, bi-metal blades are sub-divided as either general-purpose blades or production-sawing blades:

Carbide-Tipped Blades
Although carbide-tipped blades are more expensive, machine shops may elect to trade up to a carbide-tipped blade for three key reasons:

The various choices of carbide-tipped blades will cover the machinability spectrum, but they are most often used for hard-to-cut materials like super alloys. High-performance carbide-tipped blades work especially well with hard tool steel that needs to be cut fast.

While these blades cost more upfront, they are designed to take more bite and more chip load, which allows for faster cutting and typically save costs in the long run. Some high-performance carbide-tipped blades—especially coated versions—can offer extreme cutting rates, while others can perform exceptionally well when cutting super alloys.

Balancing Cost with Productivity
In some cases, the decision between bi-metal and carbide-tipped blades may not be crystal clear and will require some strategic choices. Ultimately, to make the best saw blade selection, operation managers need to weigh the following:

This may mean that a shop will have to spend a little more upfront to save money in the long run. Like any equipment and tooling investment, blade selection should be about more than the initial price tag. By understanding some of the basic features of each blade type and then strategically assessing operational needs and goals, managers can make informed purchasing decisions that will help their metal-cutting operations reach their full potential and, ultimately, achieve market success.

blade life

Benefits of Choosing Carbide Blade Technology for Your Metal Service Center

December 5, 2015 / , , , , , ,


Any metal-cutting expert knows that having the right blade for the job is critical. Although it may seem like a small operational detail, blade performance impacts several key business areas, including productivity, maintenance, quality, and tooling costs.

Like any purchasing decision, blade selection needs to be strategic, taking into consideration a host of variables—business goals, material type, equipment, and operator skill level, to name just a few. Blade performance is also based on several variables—the cutting application, blade specification, number of teeth per inch, tooth set, etc. Put simply, not every blade is created equal, and choosing the wrong blade can result in poor quality cutting and higher operational costs.

The problem is that many of today’s service centers don’t even realize they are using the “wrong” blade. In many cases, companies settle for “good” instead of “great.” Managers and operators become content with the blade technology they’ve been using for years and end up missing out on the benefits a new blade technology could bring to their operation.

This is a common occurrence in band sawing. For example, many service centers have used bi-metal band saw blades over the years and have had decent results. And in many cases, bi-metal blades are a good choice. However, there are applications in which carbide blade technology would be the better choice.

Many companies are finding that making the switch to carbide blade technology can provide savings and productivity gains they would never have achieved with bi-metal blades. This was the case for Aerodyne Alloys, a metal service center featured here in Today’s Energy Solutions. For years, the company’s Greenville, South Carolina facility used bi-metal blades to cut its toughest metals, including stainless steel, nickel alloy, and super-alloys like Inconel 718 and Hastelloy.

To gain more performance out of its band saws, Aerodyne decided to upgrade to carbide blades. Carbide-tipped band saw blades use strong, durable materials to provide high performance, faster cutting, and prolonged blade life. The blade tooth has carbide tips welded to a high-strength alloy backing, allowing the metal service center to take on hard, nickel-based alloys, as well as stainless steel, tool steel, and titanium.

In addition to tackling hard-to-cut metals, carbide-tipped band saw blades offer longer blade life and faster cutting. The white paper, Characteristics of a Carbide-Friendly Band Saw Machine, further elaborates the benefits of the carbide technology by providing a real-life comparison between a bi-metal blade and a carbide-tipped blade. The test produced the following results:

Ultimately, the higher speed and feed rate of the carbide blade enabled it to make the cut 13 minutes faster, translating into 160 more parts produced during an 8-hour shift than its bi-metal counterpart.

Carbide-tipped band saw blades can also deliver benefits to a metalworking operation by producing an improved surface finish. In many cases, a cut part will require additional processing steps downstream in order to refine the finish. By having a smoother finish, the carbide blade can reduce the number of secondary processes, which saves both time and money.

A good example of this is LENOX’s new carbide blade technology, which was featured in the latest issue of Modern Metals. Developed to cut aluminum and nonferrous alloys, the carbide-tipped band saw blade is able to make straight cuts at high speeds without sacrificing surface finish. As stated in the article, the blade tip’s particular grade of carbide wears very slowly, which is ideal for cutting aluminum. A multi-chip tooth pattern balances the chip load and reduces cutting forces, and sharp-edged teeth and high rake angles penetrate material more easily. The cutting tool is said to be the latest blade designed specifically to cut aluminum and nonferrous parts often used in today’s aerospace and automotive applications.

As carbide blade technology continues to advance, the more options service centers have to optimize and grow their operations. Whether the goal is to take on a harder material, improve performance, or increase quality, carbide-tipped blades are an investment worth considering. While the upfront product cost may be higher than other blade types, benefits like improved productivity, lower operational costs, and higher customer satisfaction will pay off in the long run.

For more information on the benefits of carbide blade technology, click here to download the white paper, “Leveraging Carbide Blade Technology to Increase the Productivity of Your Sawing Operation.”

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